The Alex Awards are given each year to 10 books that were written for adults but hold appeal to younger audiences.  We have this year’s selection on display – come check one out!

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This week I had the good fortune be invited to Sarah Ibson’s 8th grade class as they kicked off a unit on World War II and the Holocaust by exploring important themes of this historic period through the lens children’s literature.  They even invited me read one of the books aloud to the class!  As I observed students tease apart the stories for universal lessons, I was struck by the clarity and intensity of messages conveyed by the illustrators and authors of these books.  Although written to be accessible to children, the historical information, depth of human emotion, and moral messages are relevant to readers of all ages.

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The Harwood Library has a small, but quality collection of children’s books.  If you’re looking for a wider selection, try your local public library (the titles above are from Moretown Public Library).

 


My favorite character was…

“George because the whole story revolves around her.  She can present herself strongly as a girl.  She showed power.”

“Kelly because she supported George with the play and didn’t care that she wanted to be a girl.”

“George, because she was very strong.”

“Kelly, because she was a great friend to George.  She understood and helped George out!”

“Kelly, she was supportive and nice.”

“George because she showed female empowerment”

“Kelly, because she is cool, quirky, and accepts George for who she is.”

“George, because she’s trying to be a girl and it’s telling you you can be anything.”

 
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